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Comparing Weddings… we all do it!

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Comparing weddings…  we all do it!  See Talk to the Press’ latest article in The Sun, where we speak to three generations of women from one family who have been comparing weddings and how they’ve changed over the years.

A recent study revealed that wedding tradition has changed and the bride’s family no longer fund the big day.  26 year old Leanne Bryan, an admin manager, and her husband, Alan, 30, a banker, from Quedgeley, Gloucester funded their £13,000 wedding in May 2014 through their own savings and earnings, without help from their parents.

In contrast, Leanne’s 51 year old mother Adele’s parents funded part of her £2,000 wedding day in 1984, while her grandmother Maureen’s parents covered the entire cost of her £25 wedding in 1961. Here, the three generations compare the details of their big days.

Leanne and Alan married in May 2014 at a country manor in Gloucestershire with 90 guests, following a 12 month engagement and having lived together for four years. The pair splurged their budget on personal touches, like fireworks and a caricaturist.

They had burgers for the wedding breakfast and swapped traditional post-ceremony canapes for an ice cream cart serving ice cream in cones, and drank Pimms and sparkling wine. Leanne’s grandma made their three-tier cake, which was iced with emblems representing their relationship – such as edible windmills because the couple used to live in Holland.

Leanne wore a £1,000 Maggie Sottero gown with a long train, and carried a pastel-coloured bouquet, while Alan wore a top hat and tail and carried a cane. The pair had three bridesmaids, three groomsmen, a maid of honour and a best man. Unlike her parents’ generation, the couple didn’t do a gift list, but her parents treated the newlyweds to a three-week L.A and Las Vegas honeymoon.

In contrast, Adele Thomas, 51, who works in retail, from Hardwicke, Gloucester received some financial contribution from her parents towards her £2,000 wedding to Richmund, 54, an IT technician, in May 1984.

They married in a little church in Quedgeley, Gloucester when he was 24 and she was 20, after six months of living together and 18 months engagement. Adele’s parents paid for the ceremony and reception venue and Richmund and Adele funded extras like the photographer and a horse and carriage.

In the absence of online gift lists in the 80s, the pair posted gift lists to their 80 guests. Adele’s mum made Adele’s puffball sleeved dress and her two bridesmaids’ dresses. She also picked honeysuckle from her own garden and made Adele’s three-tier fruit cake. Guests drank sherry at their function room reception and ate a chicken main course. The pair honeymooned in Wales in a cosy cottage for a week.

Unlike her daughter and granddaughter, Maureen Smith, 71, from Gloucester, who has been married to her husband John, 75, for 53 years, had her £25 wedding in 1961 funded by Maureen’s parents.  Before retiring they ran an art and framing business together.

The pair married when Maureen was 17 and John was 21 after an 18 month engagement and having never lived together. Maureen arrived at the church in a Vauxhall wearing a lace, calf-skimming dress – bought in the January sales for £5 – with one bridesmaid, holding a bouquet of red roses. After the church ceremony the couple held a reception in the function room of John’s mother’s pub for 39 guests, with a classic 60s buffet of vol au vents and mini sandwiches, cocktail sausages – and a traditional three-tier fruit cake.

Guests gave them household items like casserole dishes and kettles. They took a four-day honeymoon in Weston-super-Mare. Leanne says: “Comparing my wedding day with my mum and grandma makes mine look over the top – but the money we spent was all our own and the day itself was perfect.”

We placed Leanne’s story with The Sun and are now in the process of securing her a magazine deal too. We’re always on the hunt for interesting an lighthearted features (not just the gritty and hard-hitting stuff).  If you would like to appear in a magazine or newspaper, and you have any interesting feature ideas, we’d like to hear from you.

Simply complete the story/contact form on the right hand side of this page and we’ll get back to you straight away to let you know if it’s something we would be interested in, and how much your feature is likely to be worth.  Read more about Talk to the Press here: https://www.talktothepress.co.uk/about-us/meet-the-team

 

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